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1. CAN REFLEXOLOGY HELP PSORIASIS (SKIN DISORDERS)?

One of the things that I love about reflexology is that it is efficient, effective and it has a wonderful knack for reducing the symptoms of just about anything that ails you. Take psoriasis, for example. Although reflexology is never considered a cure for any disease, many people have tried reflexology when all else failed. Reports indicate that it often helps.

As a skin disorder, psoriasis may appear as a red scaly rash, a patch of inflamed skin that is often too tender to touch. It can also have blisters or thick plaques that have a silvery shine. Basically the normal process of
skin renewal is on overdrive and new skin cells form more rapidly. Now, we know that the skin is the largest
organ for elimination. It is through the skin via perspiration that many toxins are excreted. You can also think of the skin as an organ of respiration because it allows your body to absorb or inhale and release or exhale.
Almost two square yards in size, it removes waste and toxins from the body joining the liver, kidneys, lymph, large intestines and lungs in this process. If elimination is less than optimum in any or all of these organs, how is it not possible that the skin will reflect this in some way? Of course stress is the number one factor in almost all pathologies so reducing stress is a great and efficient way to start.

A good place to start is with a reflexology de-stressing protocol. Be sure to include the adrenal reflexes for their connection to stress reduction and additionally their help in reducing inflammation. Next, detail all the other elimination organ reflexes: liver, kidneys, lymph, large intestines and lungs. Psoriasis can allow more calcium to be removed from the affected skin, so consider detailing the parathyroid reflexes for their support of calcium balance. Do not forget that the skin with psoriasis can be thick and hard and prone to cracking. You will need to avoid any open fissures or sores. If this occurs on the feet, you can work on the hands and vice versa.
(See Reference here)

2. WHAT IS REFLEXOLOGY?

Reflexology is the science or method of stimulating reflexes of the foot, hand or ear that correspond to
each gland, organ and part of the body. Stimulation of these reflexes serves to relax and normalize all
functions of the body in order to promote a natural balance and revitalization.


3. DOES REFLEXOLOGY CURE DISEASES OR AILMENTS?


Reflexology is not intended to cure diseases or ailments. Reflexologists are not medical practitioners
and are not allowed to diagnose ailments or treat disease. Reflexology can be a valuable way of
indicating areas where higher stress or tension is present in the body and can assist to relieve that
stress or tension which can promote or encourage the natural healing process. 

4. WHAT DOES REFLEXOLOGY DO?

Reflexology can relieve tension and promote relaxation. Medical studies show that over 75% of all
health problems can be linked to tension and stress. Our modern lifestyles not only cause a great
deal of this stress, but also do nothing to relieve it.

5. HOW DOES IT WORK?

There are many theories about how reflexology works, but the most commonly held belief is that
Reflexology acts to relax those reflexes that in turn are connected to various parts of the body,
improving lymphatic drainage and circulation as well as relaxing muscles and stimulating nerve
connections. Reflexology is primarily a relaxation technique, and while research clearly indicates
that reflexology benefits patients health in both chronic and other ailments, it is not a substitute for
medical treatment, and should be considered as complementary to any type of medical treatment.
Extensive research on reflexology has validated the effectiveness of reflexology. For more general
information and articles about reflexology, click here.

6. IS REFLEXOLOGY NEW?

Although recently becoming much more popular and accepted in modern society, reflexology
hasbeen practiced for thousands of years by Egyptians, Chinese, Indian, Japanese, Native American
cultures and Mayan and Incan civilizations. It is widely accepted in many European countries as an
accepted therapy. Modern reflexology has its origins in the late 1930's, thanks to Eunice Ingham.

7. IS IT THE SAME AS MASSAGE, ACUPUNCTURE, ACUPRESSURE OR SHIATSU?

Reflexology is not the same as massage, which involves tissue and muscle therapy to promote
relaxation. Acupuncture, Acupressure and Shiatsu are similar in some respects to reflexology in
their use of reflexes or meridians of the body as they relate to the gland, organs and parts of the
body, however reflexology focuses on relaxation of those reflexes through manipulation to reduce
stress and tension.

8. CAN REFLEXOLOGY MAKE A CONDITION WORSE?

No. Reflexology is a non-invasive natural therapy that relaxes the body and is essentially harmless.
On rare occasions, release of toxins as a result of the body's natural healing process may result in
symptoms such as perspiration, nausea or headaches, however these symptoms are not directly
related to Reflexology, and are temporary and not serious.
Be sure to consult your GP before seeing
a reflexoligist, if you think you have any medical conditions; (e.g. pace maker, pregnancy, etc)


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